“Death By Meeting” – Book Review

Death by Meeting: A Leadership Fable…about Solving the Most Painful Problem in Business by Patrick Lencioni My rating: 4 of 5 stars I rounded out my vacation by reading a Lencioni parable by the pool, because that’s the kind of geek that I am! If you are in an environment where the first response to every issue is, “We need a meeting,” then this is the book for you! It demonstrates a great way to interpret the needs of a business and its employees by structuring appropriate meetings for each topic and function. Lencioni, as always, presented the material in a fun, analogous way to make it resonate with small and large business structures. As he points out, meetings can become monotonous and a huge waste of time. People would rather do anything than go to a meeting, when it really should be like playtime for executives. Matching structure to context, Lencioni devises ways for any business to change meetings from drudgery to enjoyable, productive time spent with your colleagues. This is not a book about training, or executing conferences or workshops. If you are looking for ways to keep people engaged in learning, then another choice would be better. If you find yourself scheduling meetings all day and qualify that time as different than hours when you “get real work done,” then you definitely need this book. Here’s a tip if you are not in charge of meetings and will upset the status quo if you speak out of turn about the meeting drain at your company: suggest everyone read it as a book club subject. In one fell swoop, you might just get everyone on board to restructure meetings so that they are the real work. View all my...
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Ready. Set. Vacation!

Are you ready for a break? I mean a real break. A vacation away from home. I have to say that I am more than ready. It’s been a year since we took a family vacation which is unusual for us. We almost always take a week away during our children’s school breaks—both winter and spring breaks. My husband and I took a long weekend last August and it feels like it was eons ago. The nonstop juggling of family, work, and other obligations takes a toll on my physical and creative energy. I sort of feel like a computer with too many programs running; I need to unplug and re-boot. The family and I are headed to one of our favorite resorts in Scottsdale, AZ next week. Temperatures are already soaring over 100 degrees there, but it really won’t matter. Pool time is typically offset with miniature golf, seeing some movies, dining in our favorite restaurants, a Diamondbacks game, a little sightseeing, board and card games, and completing at least one jigsaw puzzle. I can’t wait! I expect to come back refreshed, reinvigorated, and motivated for all of life’s obligations. Here are some health benefits of vacation from a website Standard Life: Five reasons to go on vacation Relieve stress
 The very first benefit of leaving everything behind and relieving your brain of all your worries is reduced stress.

Several studies have shown a direct link between stress and health conditions such as headaches, cardiovascular diseases, cancer and other types of infections acquired as a result of a weaker immune system. It has also been scientifically established that taking vacations reduces the incidence of burnout.

Relief from stress often gives us a new perspective on life, allows us to regain energy and often to find simple and sometimes obvious solutions to problems that had previously seemed impossible to solve. Improve your mental skills
 Some studies have found a positive relationship between vacations and intellectual function. A well-rested mind that is free of worry is often more effective. Improve your physical health
 Besides getting you away from daily stressors, a vacation often gives you the opportunity to catch up on sleep and exercise, two simple remedies for many aches and pains. Strengthen family ties
Too often, in our fast-paced daily routine, family relationships suffer. A vacation is a great opportunity to discover each other in a different setting and to build lasting memories....
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http://www.feingold.org/enews/giving2010.html

http://www.feingold.org/enews/giving2010.html
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It’s the Eggs!

That’s right! The eggs were missing. We added two and that seemed to do the trick just fine. 
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To Norm!

b. 5.10.1928d. 7.15.2009 Norman David Joeb was just about the happiest man I ever met. Nothing ever kept him down. I met him when I was nine years old when he and my mother began their very long relationship together. Norman was never bound by practicality and pragmatic planning and budgeting—much like a nine year old girl! As a child and teenager, if I ever said I needed or wanted something, his automatic response was, “Get your shoes on. Do you know where we need to go to get one for you?” My mother would cringe from his generous spirit and joyful attitude. None of those usual parenting restraints came into play. She would try to explain why he shouldn’t just fill my every whim, but when an adult thinks the reasons are bogus too, it makes it much easier to have your every whim fulfilled. I sometimes felt guilty for taking him up on his “you have to have that attitude”; I felt I had more restraint sometimes than he did. Mom was there to temper most of it and I was kind enough to not completely take advantage if him. Not completely. He loved to shop. I think a young teen’s wants enhanced his inhibitions—not to mention a woman (my mother) who loves clothes. A child in the Depression era, he relished the ability to purchase unlike so many from that generation who fear the loss of every penny. Truth be told, my mom could out-shop him. He spent a portion of every trip to the mall sitting in a department store’s shoe department waiting for my mom with the bags of clothes and shoes. Norm loved pastries and hot dogs and recalled his youth with potato salad made with whipped cream. I still cannot imagine anything quite so indulgent. He was born the same year that Mickey Mouse made his début and that detail of his life did not go unnoticed. He loved to wear his Mickey Mouse watch and loved the ideals held at Disneyland—the fantastic Main Street and all the fantastic details of fairy tails and heroic adventures come to life. Many summer evenings we drove over to the Disneyland Hotel to see the water show. This predated Phantasmic but was just as spectacular for its time. From the front porch of the apartment my mother and I lived in, we had a perfect...
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