When Profiling Gets Out of Hand (I’m talking Twitter)

  When I first created an account on Twitter most of my docket was freelance writing so I used my name, my byline, as my Twitter handle: @LeslieAMSmith. Using simply your name allows a lot of latitude as far as your brand is concerned. I could post about most any topic and it was fine. As my business ticked back toward marketing and public relations, I started posting more about those things. I could see followers increase when I posted about certain topics (#leadership, #entrepreneurship, #business, #consultant). I also attracted followers when I used hashtags with much different descriptors (#humor #comedy #creative #arts), but whenever I did, the followers of the other tweets went away. Juggling Personalities Recently, I separated the two and put the PR and marketing squarely with a new identity: @McCormickLA_PR (my company name). Feel free to follow me on one side or the other, or both. Of course, as soon as I created @McCormickLA_PR I noticed individual PR consultants going by their names alone and experienced some dissonance. I also have inadvertently shared things on the thread I didn’t mean to simply because I was logged in to the wrong one. It’s no big deal, really, but that is one of the reasons I had kept to just one place for Tweets—personal and business. I limited some of the snark, though, knowing that clients and potential clients might be following me and be surprised by my sarcasm or turned off. However, so far, it’s more good than bad by splitting my interests. I’ve also started to read more people’s profiles with a critical eye. Tips for your Twitter Profile If you are trying too hard to fit in everything that might make someone inclined to follow you, it might just be too much. I recently saw a person’s profile include his business interests, and “preemie issues.” I read it twice to know if he was calling premature start-up businesses “preemies” or if he meant babies. He meant babies. Sure, those are things that he’s interested in a 360º view of his personality. But I don’t want to follow him if that’s what he posts about. I can’t relate and therefore that one incongruent fact stands out more than anything. I love knitting and crocheting and therefore follow people who are experts in those crafts, but I don’t list that in my profile because I don’t post about...
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Creating Brand Ambassadors

On my recent vacation to tour the Kentucky Bourbon Trail, I learned some surprising things about the business of distilling liquor that started with the regulations that determine legitimate bourbon from whiskey and ended with the steps that made me a brand ambassador. I was posting on Facebook constantly throughout our trip and when I did so, Facebook’s location capability would find the distillery on the map and suggest I like that fan page. Turns out, these places, Buffalo Trace in particular, have some really great Facebook feeds featuring some mouth-watering photos of their bourbon recipes that include many desserts. I LIKE the photos, I SHARE the posts and have inadvertently become a brand ambassador. Added to my digital promotion, I bought plenty of merchandise from the distilleries and other Kentucky and Tennessee hotspots. One tradition of ours is to buy a Christmas ornament every place we go on vacation. And you thought a bourbon Christmas ornament was just a fantasy! Fear not … or be fearful, they exist! Beyond the realm of being a Facebook Fan, there are other added incentives for the true bourbon aficionado, including having your name on a barrel that’s still aging at Maker’s Mark. My husband signed up to be a Maker’s Mark ambassador a few years ago. They send him a cute little gift every Christmas like a knitted cap for his bottle. It’s just cute, silly stuff that says, “We appreciate you!” If you are in charge of your business’s promotional efforts, including the social media, then you know that it is not always easy to entice people to LIKE and SHARE posts. Here are a few tips that Kentucky distillers taught me about recruiting brand ambassadors. They successfully recruited me and I barely realized what was happening. 1. You need an online presence. There’s no staying in the shadows these days and hoping to keep a viable following and loyal stream of customers. People use their smartphones more and more and if you can’t be found, that’s a problem. Make sure the information online is correct. If you have moved locations, make sure you change that on all platforms—Foursquare, Yelp, Google, etc. 2. When people do visit your business, make sure they have a great experience, even if they don’t buy anything. There were tours and tastings that were better than others, but all of the staff were hospitable and...
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New Business Success – Three Tactics for Every New Business

  Have you recently started your own business? Whether you are transitioning from employee to owner or breaking away from a partnership, these three fundamentals of promotion will aid your business development swiftly. 1. Website You cannot be taken seriously these days without a website. Make sure all the tabs work and that the site is accessible on all platforms: desktop computers, tablets, and smart phones. As well, make sure it works with all browsers. No one wants to be told that their chosen browser is insufficient for your website. Being accessible means that you accommodate your clients, not the other way around. 2. Letter Write a letter with your announcement to everyone you know. You can snail mail it or email it. You might have two lists to accommodate anyone who does not check their email very often. Write to your family, your friends, colleagues, past clients if any, potential clients who you know, and potential referral sources. It’s important to explain your area of expertise and how the reader can help you build a successful business. 3. Press Release Distribute a press release to all relevant media for several angles. Send it to sections of newspapers that announce new businesses or career advancements. Don’t forget your alumni magazine! If you are selling a new product, then pitch your story to business sections and trade journals in your field. Even if you are not blessed with a feature story from the initial release, you have established a presence and even an authoritative voice on your subject with reporters. These three tactics are only the beginning and should not be done without first creating a business plan, a marketing plan, and deciding your key branding messages. However, these are easy steps to proclaim yourself open for business–virtually and literally–and establish a support system in the marketplace. Your prospects will have no choice but to respond. If you need help with any of these, please contact me for help. Leslie@McCormickLA.com...
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Social Media Persona

As you are branding yourself through social media channels you have probably noticed that you are creating a persona for your brand. The words you use, the attitude you take, the kinds of things you retweet, favorite or like all help form your persona that is an extension of your brand. This can be a personal brand for you as an individual or it could be for your business of many people. It’s because social media is constant and quick that it is easy to create a persona almost immediately and fit into that role. Masters of Disguise When you are promoting more than one business because you are a n ambitious entrepreneur or because you are in the social media business promoting for others, you probably find yourself going in and out of roles like acting in a one-person play. You’re the perfect homemaker for one business, a fashionista for another, a caregiver for yet another, and then you let loose as the snarky person you are under another moniker that may or may not be your own. Image Matters Your image takes shape as you keep posting under that persona, but your literal image—the picture you use—matters. I think sometimes people forget that the photo says as much about their persona as their words. A member of the media who has a photo of herself wearing a slip dress with boudoir-red wallpaper in the background tells me not to take her seriously as a journalist. The image says romance, fashion, evening out, but her tweets are about local politics. It’s awkwardly incongruent. Choose an image that is consistent with the persona you are playing. Divide and Conquer We all have inner dichotomies that if we expressed fully it might seem as though we have multiple personalities. However, you might feel as though if you don’t express both, then you’ll explode. By all means, release the pressure! It’s easy by dividing those attitudes and creating another persona. Angels and Devils can both love your product after all. Imagine you have a mommy blog that is very successful with ads and product giveaways, and maybe even a book deal based on your posts—the whole kit and caboodle! Your reputation is based on being extremely gentle with new, nervous parents. However, you notice that there are some recurring really stupid questions (yes, there are stupid questions, I firmly believe that,...
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Branding Personality

I know this sophisticated woman with coiffed hair and stylish clothing. She can be very formal and professional, but she can also be the life of the party. She’s passionate about ensuring that the children in Long Beach come first—that their needs are met and they are given opportunities that they deserve. She has many friends who she teaches to be effective leaders by showing them how to lead volunteers and organize successful programs and events, she feels strongly about her way of doing things, but is open to new techniques. She’s charming and witty and very clever. She’s kind and considerate and a perfect hostess with perfect manners. As such, she is always looking for new friends to share her knowledge with and help make Long Beach an even better community. If you think I just described a favorite aunt, guess again. I just described the Junior League of Long Beach (JLLB) as if the organization were a person. I have been a JLLB member for ten years and have great respect for this 80 year old nonprofit in Long Beach. How I described her tells you a lot about her personality and sets your expectations for being around her. To describe your organization as if it were a person, will help you define your brand. From what you read above, does the JLLB send out thank you notes? You bet! Does she have an open door policy for membership? Yes, but you have to go through a new member training curriculum, of course. She does things properly and thoroughly! Your brand is more than your logo and the colors you use. It is the visceral response you evoke from everything you do. When you don’t behave within your brand, you are essentially breaking character. If you have established a strong brand, acting inconsistent with your brand is conspicuous. If you don’t have a strong brand, and people don’t know what to expect from you, then nothing you do is conspicuous or meaningful. You won’t be remembered as anything special. You establish a brand by offering consistency not just in using your logo consistently, but in the services you offer, the core values you adopt, and the way you behave. If the JLLB offered a pin-up calendar as a fundraiser, that would be conspicuously incongruent with whom I described above. Try it! Personify your product, service or organization....
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